CENTER FOR ETHICS AND THE RULE OF LAW​

Using Targeted Killing to Fight the War on Terror: Philosophical, Moral and Legal Challenges

Co-sponsored by: Jean beer Blumenfeld Center for Ethics of Georgia State

The Obama administration has authorized the
CIA to target and kill Anwar al-Aulaqi, a radical Muslim cleric believed to have ties to al-Qaeda, on the ground that he helped to orchestrate attacks against the United States. The authorization raises the interesting question of who is a
legitimate target of such military actions. In particular, it is arguably difficult to think of al-Aulaqi as a belligerent against the U.S., as he is himself an American citizen. Al-Aulaqi, however, is not the only person whose identification as
a legitimate target raises moral and legal complications. The U.S. and other governments have been targeting and killing many others as part of both the fight against Islamic terrorists and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the widespread use
of this technique raises important questions in just war theory. Notable as well is the fact that the U.S. has been targeting suspected militants with unmanned aerial drones, sophisticated military planes controlled remotely from distant lands.

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Using Targeted Killing to Fight the War on Terror: Philosophical, Moral and Legal Challenges